Thursday, July 19, 2007

CRFG booth, calling rare fruits for gelato

Howdy folks,I'm working hard not only to try to get as much garden club/plant society participation in "Cross-Pollination" as I possibly can, but tomake sure that CRFG's booth is a big hit and that we'll draw in somenew members. Part of what will make our booth stand out, I think, ishaving some rare fruit gelato. Gelateria Naia is willing to make gelato out of fruit we barter. They keep most of it, but give us a share based on how much fruit we give them. Are you or other CRFGers you know of willing to donate some fruit from your yards towards the making of some gelato to be stored until the 9/23/07 date of the fair?Chris of Gelateria Naia says they're most interested in: "Mulberries, Cherimoya, Longan, Lychee, Paw Paw,Tamarind... our "holy grail" of fruit is my personal favorite, theMangosteen."They have also made gelato of feijoa that CRFGers have bartered. They need a minimum of 10 lbs. but prefer even more. Even if you don't get 10 lb. crops, perhaps several CRFG members can pool their harvests to make the 10 lb. minimum. If you have fruit that will become ripe between now and mid-September, please contact Megan Lynch at spidra@speakeasy.net so she can co-ordinate the barter. Your donation of fruit will help make CRFG's booth at the UC Botanical Garden event "Cross-Pollination" a big hit and hopefully that will translate into a bunch of new members for our chapter.

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Sounds like this will be the East Bay version of the SF Botanical Garden's annual Summer Garden Fair on Aug. 4.

Can you post a little more about it?

Gail said...

I wonder how Light Brown Apple Moth quarantine restrictions will affect this (both the fruit for the gelato and the event itself). My understanding is that you're not supposed to move any plant material on the host list at all, even within the quarantined counties. Pretty severe.

Megan Lynch said...

Hi Anonymous,

Well, unfortunately for me, I didn't know the SFBG put on an event like that. My idea was that there are an awful lot of specialist and generalist garden groups and plant societies out there and that people from those groups don't often cross lines... I wanted to throw a bunch of different folks together, give groups a chance to let the public know what they do and recruit new members, invite groups that aren't always included in garden fairs (watershed restoration, school gardens, community gardens, prison gardens) and try to get various classes, races and ethnicities of plant lovers a chance to rub elbows and get to know one another.

Please spread the word about the event! If you hit the "Cross-Pollination" link above, it'll take you to an event description and allow you to RSVP or "watch" the event.

Megan Lynch said...

Gail, I've mentioned the LBAM to UCBG's Event Coordinator so that we make sure we adhere to whatever rules the Botanical Garden has about plant materials. The fruit for the gelato should be no problem because that fruit will be going straight into gelato.

We hope to get Dr. Robert Raabe to be one of our presenters at the fair - topic will be LBAM.

Megan Lynch said...

The Cross-Pollination link above has been updated to give all the groups and individuals we have commitments from at this point. Idell and I will be working the CRFG table although it would be nice if we could get another couple CRFG volunteers to attend with us. We're both looking forward to this event and hope it'll become an annual one.

No one came through with fruit, but I made some fig ice cream at home to bring with us.

Gail said...

I can help out for a couple of hours at the beginning.
Fig ice cream!
At the Festival of Fruit, they had a vendor with all sorts of rare fruit ice creams, single flavors and combinations. The grand finale of the dinner was filling out a form to choose the 3 flavors you wanted to try. You waited in suspense until they called the number of your table, then took your forms over to the carts, where 4-5 volunteers were madly scooping it out.
I don't think they had fig, though.